Archive for the ‘Grace’ Category

Give thanks to God

Give thanks to the Lord, for he is good; his love endures forever.  –Psalm 107:1*

Recently I’ve been pondering what it means to give thanks to God. The Bible is full of examples of thanksgiving being lifted up to the Lord.  After giving it much thought, I’ve come to several conclusions. First and foremost, thanking God is my way of acknowledging His supreme authority and position in my life.  God gave me life! Everything that is good in my life is a gift from Him.

I will praise God’s name in song and glorify him with thanksgiving. –Psalm 69:30

Second, there are multiple ways to give thanks to God.  These include praying; through the written, recorded and spoken work; in song; in giving of one’s time and treasure; and in prayerfully doing good works for others with no motive other than serving God. I write this blog as a thank offering to God. There are many other ways of thanking God that area not listed here. It occurs to me that we can thank God in almost any situation we encounter throughout the day. Continually thanking God can help one remain cognizant of God’s endless presence in his or her life.

Rejoice always, pray continually, give thanks in all circumstances; for this is God’s will for you in Christ Jesus.  –I Thessalonians 5:16-18

Third, we are to thank God in all circumstances, both the easy times, the difficult ones and those in between.  In Philippians 4, the Apostle Paul tells us he has learned to be content whatever his circumstances. This is a tough one. In my lifetime I’ve had some real tragedies. When tragedy strikes, it is particularly difficult to discern any good at the time.  Over the years I’ve learned to pray to God for strength to get me though the difficulties and to give me wisdom to understand.  While it was difficult to discern the good at the time, in retrospect each difficult period of my life was a time of learning and spiritual growth that helped prepare me for God’s eternal kingdom.   

Thanks be to God for his indescribable gift!  –2 Corinthians 9:15

Finally, give thanks to the lord for his grace in offering us salvation through Jesus Christ.

Doxology

I thank you, God, for your grace, the gift of life and my salvation through Jesus Christ.  Thank you for the Godly women who helped lead me to the Savior in my childhood. Thank you for loving aunts, uncles, and grandparents who helped raise and care for me after my parents divorced. Thank you for the churches and teachers who helped nurture and train me along the way. Thank you for giving me a godly wife to share my life with. Thank you for my children and grandchildren who bring joy to my life. Thank you for friends and family who have added richness to my life. Thank you for protecting and shielding me during times of trouble. Thank you for the work that enables me to sustain my family. Thank you for this day and all my days to come. Thanks be to God!

Now thank we all our God, with heart and hands and voices,

Who wondrous things has done, in Whom this world rejoices;

Who from our mothers’ arms has blessed us on our way,

With countless gifts of love, and still is ours today. 

Hymn – Now Thank We All Our God:

*All Bible quotes are NIV.

Stay close to the word

“The Bible is not an option; it is a necessity. You cannot grow spiritually strong without it.” –Billy Graham

I’m shocked at how many professing Christians I’ve met know very little about the Bible. How can this be? The biblical Hebrew faith placed great emphasis on reading the Scriptures aloud and then interpreting the reading. Luke 4:14-20 tells us:

“Jesus returned to Galilee in the power of the Spirit, and news about him spread through the whole countryside. He was teaching in their synagogues, and everyone praised him. He went to Nazareth, where he had been brought up, and on the Sabbath day he went into the synagogue, as was his custom. He stood up to read, and the scroll of the prophet Isaiah was handed to him. Unrolling it, he found the place where it is written: ‘The Spirit of the Lord is on me, because he has anointed me to proclaim good news to the poor. He has sent me to proclaim freedom for the prisoners and recovery of sight for the blind, to set the oppressed free, to proclaim the year of the Lord’s favor.’ Then he rolled up the scroll, gave it back to the attendant and sat down. The eyes of everyone in the synagogue were fastened on him. He began by saying to them, ‘Today this scripture is fulfilled in your hearing.’”

When the people of Israel returned to Jerusalem after years of Babylonian captivity, the scribe Ezra brought the Book of the Law of Moses before them to read. Nehemiah 8:3 tells us, “He read it aloud from daybreak till noon as he faced the square before the Water Gate in the presence of the men, women and others who could understand. And all the people listened attentively to the Book of the Law.” Not only did the people listen to the reading of the Law from early morning until midday; they paid attention; they rose to their feet when Ezra opened the book (v.5); answered “Amen, Amen,” at the reading of the book (v.6); stood in their places (v.7); they all wept when they heard the words of the Law (v.9); and the people departed with great joy “because they now understood the words that had been made known to them” on that day (v.12).

The early Christians adopted a model of the public reading and interpretation of Scripture in worship; it has remained the practice in most Christian churches through the centuries. I was raised as a Southern Baptist, a denomination that emphasizes lifelong Bible study and exposes children to the Scripture from a very early age.  This occurs through the spoken word in sermons and Scripture readings during worship services; and by studying Scripture in Sunday school, Children’s Church, Bible studies, and other settings. The sermon is the centerpiece of the worship service. Immediately following the sermon there is a call by the preacher to respond to the sermon’s message by walking to the front of the sanctuary and professing one’s faith publicly or making a public rededication of one’s life to Christ.

Today I am an Anglican. Anglican worship services focus on “Word and Table,” the latter being the sacrament of Holy Communion. As for the word, Anglicans maintain a theological position that proclaiming the word is a means of grace; the word includes the sermon, but the emphasis is on proclaiming the witness to God in Jesus Christ and on God’s grace that flows through the proclamation. This proclamation is made both through Scripture reading and preaching a sermon. Sermons usually focus on one or more of the scripture selections in the appointed Lectionary readings of the day. The idea of the word places emphasis on the proclamation of Scripture as the spoken word of God that bears witness to the incarnate Word in Jesus Christ. However, it is not simply that it bears witness. The spoken word becomes the living and active word of God so that God speaks through the spoken word of Scripture. The spoken word becomes a means of grace.

Anglicans view the living word as a vehicle for performing God’s work in this world. As Hebrews 4:12 says, “For the word of God is alive and active. Sharper than any double-edged sword, it penetrates even to dividing soul and spirit, joints and marrow; it judges the thoughts and attitudes of the heart.’ Ephesians 8:17 calls the word “the Sword of the Spirit.”  The sword imagery is significant, as a sword is a weapon used both to deflect blows from an adversary and to strike back at one’s adversary.  When Jesus was tempted by Satan in the wilderness (Matthew 4:1-11), he refused Satan’s offers, citing Scripture as His defense and as a means of compelling Satan to depart from Him. Divine power flows from the words of Scripture.   

So, circling back to where I began, Christians need to study Scripture and theology! The late Rev. Dr. R. C.  Sproul explained it like this: “Many people believe that theological study holds little value. They say, ‘I don’t need theology; I just need to know Jesus.’ Yet theology is unavoidable for every Christian. It is our attempt to understand the truth that God has revealed to us—something every Christian does. So, it is not a question of whether we are going to engage in theology; it is a question of whether our theology is sound or unsound. It is important to study and learn because God has taken great pains to reveal Himself to His people. He gave us a book, one that is not meant to sit on a shelf pressing dried flowers, but to be read, searched, digested, studied, and chiefly to be understood.”

All Scripture is God-breathed and is useful for teaching, rebuking, correcting and training in righteousness, so that the servant of God may be thoroughly equipped for every good work.  –2 Timothy 3:16-17

Beware of bartering the Word of God for a more suitable conception of your own.  –Oswald Chambers, Disciples Indeed

Click the link below for ideas on how to start a daily devotional habit.

 https://www.woh.org/2022/01/24/how-to-start-a-devotional-habit/