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Political Solutions

The Lord foils the plans of the nations; he thwarts the purposes of the peoples. But the plans of the Lord stand firm forever, the purposes of his heart through all generations. Blessed is the nation whose God is the Lord, the people he chose for his inheritance.  –Psalm 33:10-12*

The November midterm elections will soon be here and the political theater being played out in the media is growing more intense by the day. We live in an age of great political division. Many national leaders and prominent politicians think that they have all the answers, but they’re wrong. As the above passage from Psalm 33 notes, “The Lord foils the plans of the nations.” God remains in charge. There are no political solutions to America’s woes.  What we need is more Jesus!

Here in America, those on the political right condemn the activities of the political left. Those on the left condemn the right.  We hear and see it every day.  “Our way is best for the American people.” “They’re weak on defense.” “They trample on the Constitution.” “They only know how to tax and spend.”  “Their policies are destroying the environment.” “Their policies are destroying the economy.”  Politics pits friend against friend, men against women, husbands against wives, parents against children, nation against nation, religion against religion, and Christian against Christian.  The latter saddens me deeply—it just shouldn’t be. Christians should be kind to everyone, especially fellow believers. The Apostle Paul tells us:

“There is neither Jew or Greek, slave or free, male or female, (insert Republican or Democrat), but we are one in Christ Jesus.”  Galatians 3:28

Jesus told Pontius Pilate in John 18:36, “My kingdom is not of this world.” This wisdom reminds all Christians that we, including politicians, answer to a higher authority than the government or political leaders.  In 1 Kings 22, the story is told of the time the King of Israel had to decide whether or not to go to war against Syria. Jehoshaphat, the King of Judah, advised his fellow ruler, “First seek the counsel of the Lord” before making a decision,” (verse 5). This is sound advice that Christians, and especially Christian politicians, would do well to take to heart. Seek God’s guidance before seeking the guidance of man.  We should also note Matthew 5:16, “…let your light shine before others, that they may see your good deeds and glorify your Father in heaven.” Christians should be the living face and hands of Christ to the world.

God “makes nations great, and He destroys them; He enlarges nations, and leads them away,” (Job 12:23). Political leaders rule because God allows them to, “for there is no authority except from God, and those that exist have been instituted by God,” (Romans 13:1b). God can upset human plans, but no one can thwart His plans or purpose. God loves the world and sent His only begotten Son to suffer and die to atone for the sins of every person of every political ilk.

Pastor Eugene Cho is CEO of Bread for the World, a non-partisan, Christian advocacy organization based in the USA. I highly recommend an article he penned a decade ago titled, “The 10 Commandments of Engaging Politics.” It contains a wealth of sound advice for Christians today as we approach the November elections. His article is available at this safe link:

Give praise to the Lord, proclaim his name; make known among the nations what he has done. Sing to him, sing praise to him; tell of all his wonderful acts. Glory in his holy name; let the hearts of those who seek the Lord rejoice. Look to the Lord and his strength; seek his face always.  –Psalm 105:1-4

*All Bible quotes are NIV.

Give thanks to God

Give thanks to the Lord, for he is good; his love endures forever.  –Psalm 107:1*

Recently I’ve been pondering what it means to give thanks to God. The Bible is full of examples of thanksgiving being lifted up to the Lord.  After giving it much thought, I’ve come to several conclusions. First and foremost, thanking God is my way of acknowledging His supreme authority and position in my life.  God gave me life! Everything that is good in my life is a gift from Him.

I will praise God’s name in song and glorify him with thanksgiving. –Psalm 69:30

Second, there are multiple ways to give thanks to God.  These include praying; through the written, recorded and spoken work; in song; in giving of one’s time and treasure; and in prayerfully doing good works for others with no motive other than serving God. I write this blog as a thank offering to God. There are many other ways of thanking God that area not listed here. It occurs to me that we can thank God in almost any situation we encounter throughout the day. Continually thanking God can help one remain cognizant of God’s endless presence in his or her life.

Rejoice always, pray continually, give thanks in all circumstances; for this is God’s will for you in Christ Jesus.  –I Thessalonians 5:16-18

Third, we are to thank God in all circumstances, both the easy times, the difficult ones and those in between.  In Philippians 4, the Apostle Paul tells us he has learned to be content whatever his circumstances. This is a tough one. In my lifetime I’ve had some real tragedies. When tragedy strikes, it is particularly difficult to discern any good at the time.  Over the years I’ve learned to pray to God for strength to get me though the difficulties and to give me wisdom to understand.  While it was difficult to discern the good at the time, in retrospect each difficult period of my life was a time of learning and spiritual growth that helped prepare me for God’s eternal kingdom.   

Thanks be to God for his indescribable gift!  –2 Corinthians 9:15

Finally, give thanks to the lord for his grace in offering us salvation through Jesus Christ.

Doxology

I thank you, God, for your grace, the gift of life and my salvation through Jesus Christ.  Thank you for the Godly women who helped lead me to the Savior in my childhood. Thank you for loving aunts, uncles, and grandparents who helped raise and care for me after my parents divorced. Thank you for the churches and teachers who helped nurture and train me along the way. Thank you for giving me a godly wife to share my life with. Thank you for my children and grandchildren who bring joy to my life. Thank you for friends and family who have added richness to my life. Thank you for protecting and shielding me during times of trouble. Thank you for the work that enables me to sustain my family. Thank you for this day and all my days to come. Thanks be to God!

Now thank we all our God, with heart and hands and voices,

Who wondrous things has done, in Whom this world rejoices;

Who from our mothers’ arms has blessed us on our way,

With countless gifts of love, and still is ours today. 

Hymn – Now Thank We All Our God:

*All Bible quotes are NIV.

Enduring truths for recent graduates

Across the country it’s graduation time. Here in South Dakota many schools have already closed for the summer. Most of those that remain open will close in the coming days. Everywhere one turns there’s another grad party. What awaits all these new grads? A decade ago I wrote an article  for my newspaper column with some advice for recent graduates. While it was aimed at high school graduates, it is also highly relevant to recent college grads. The article has become one of the most popular pieces I ever wrote. I’ve received hundreds of emails thanking me for taking the time to share it.  Therefore, I decided to  republish it annually around graduation time.  I hope some of you might find it useful.  You can view the original article in the Tribune-Democrat news at this link: http://goo.gl/LtN72

For those who are graduating high school this year and beginning the long transition into adulthood, I’d like to offer you a gift. Here are five enduring truths I have learned. They will help you through life’s journey.

Choices

“If you decide to just go with the flow, you’ll end up where the flow goes, which is usually downhill, often leading to a big pile of sludge and a life of unhappiness. You’ll end up doing what everyone else is doing.” ― Sean Covey, The 7 Habits of Highly Effective Teens

 Life will deal you an endless string of choices along the way.  Some will be trivial, like deciding what to wear today.  Others will be weighty and their outcomes will affect you forever.  Weighty decisions should always be preceded by much thought and soul searching.  This includes decisions about who you date or marry, what you put into your body, bringing children into the world, what you do for a living, how much debt you incur and who you associate with.

All of these decisions will have a lasting effect on your life. Therefore, make them slowly and deliberately. Often you’ll discover that the right choice is not the easiest one.  A habit of making poor choices will, as the Sean Covey quote suggests, drag your life downhill.

I was recently contacted by a young man who had just received a bad conduct discharge from the Navy.  He asked me how the discharge would impact his future employability.  His mistake was choosing to drive a car while intoxicated and hitting a pedestrian. Fortunately, the victim wasn’t seriously injured. Had it been otherwise, the young sailor would probably be in prison.  It was my sad responsibility to inform him that with some employers the discharge would be a black mark for life. Choices matter!

 Learning

“Experience is a hard teacher because she gives the test first, the lesson afterwards.”    ―Vernon Saunders Law, former professional baseball pitcher and Cy Young Award winner

Some of you will go on to college or technical school.  Others will enter the workforce.  Even if your formal education is over, don’t quit learning. Make learning a lifelong adventure.  I did my undergraduate work at the University of Kentucky.  The school offers a fellowship program for individuals aged 65 and older to attend classes tuition free. Every year numerous senior citizens walk the stage to receive degrees ranging from Associate of Arts to Doctor of Philosophy.  It’s never too late to learn.

Even if you don’t choose to continue formal learning, make it point to learn from life. Observe others; note their successes and failures; then learn from their experiences.  More importantly, learn from your own mistakes.

Some of the greatest lessons I’ve learned, particularly those while serving in uniform, were the result of having made a terrible mistake.  This sort of lesson sticks, like the first time you grab the handle of a hot iron skillet with your bare hand.  The key to learning from mistakes is owning them.  Admit your mistakes and then move on, having learned something from the experience.  Don’t let, “It wasn’t my fault,” be part of your vocabulary.

 Work

“A dream doesn’t become reality through magic; it takes sweat, determination and hard work.”  ―Colin Powell, retired U.S. Army four-star general and former U.S. Secretary of State

Work isn’t always fun. If it were, they’d call it play.  Work can be downright unpleasant, but it’s an essential element of life! Along the way you’re going to have jobs you won’t like. Note what you don’t like and make it a point to improve yourself, so you’ll never again have to work at such a job.

Accepting a job means submitting to the authority of those placed over you.  Learn to work within this system.   You’ll inevitably have bosses you don’t like.  Learn to respect the position, if not the individual.

Fairness

Life is not fair; get used to it.” ―Bill Gates, founder and former CEO, Microsoft Corporation

You will hear much discussion about fairness in this life. It’s all hot air.  Life isn’t fair.  Some good people die young, while some bad people live a long life.   Disease sometimes strikes arbitrarily, for no apparent reason.  Some people prosper while others suffer failure. A death or accident can change your life forever.

There is randomness to life that can’t be avoided.  Don’t expect kindness to be returned with kindness.  Don’t expect generosity to be returned with generosity.  The best choice is to be fair and kind to others and learn to accept what they return to you.

A wise man named Harry Browne ran for president of the United States on the Libertarian Party ticket. On Christmas day in 1966, Browne wrote his young daughter a letter aptly titled, “A Gift for My Daughter.”  I encourage every graduating senior to read it and digest it. In the letter, he explains to his daughter that, “Nobody owes you anything.”  Understanding what Browne meant can truly bless you. You can find it here. https://tenthamendmentcenter.com/2009/12/22/a-gift-for-my-daughter/

Faith

“A faith is a necessity to a man. Woe to him who believes in nothing.”  ―Victor Hugo

I once had a senior Army officer tell me he preferred to work with men who possessed spiritual values, regardless of their religion.  He explained that having faith in a power higher than one’s self was an indicator of how one will perform under pressure; in this instance, the pressure meant combat.

Too many people place their faith in all the wrong places.  It might be in wealth, celebrity, good looks, talent, or even government.  Whatever the case, misplaced faith leads to disappointment after disappointment.

To avoid these disappointments, put your faith in God alone.  You, your loved ones and your friends will all inevitably let you down, but God will never fail you.

Abandoned to God

Jesus walking on the water

“Come,” he said. Then Peter got down out of the boat, walked on the water and came toward Jesus. But when he saw the wind, he was afraid and, beginning to sink, cried out, “Lord, save me!” Immediately Jesus reached out his hand and caught him. “You of little faith,” he said, “why did you doubt?” Matthew 14:29-31

I’m scheduled for major surgery in a few days. The procedure will necessitate a long convalescence period. While I’ve had several surgeries during my life, this marks the first time that I’ll be under general anesthesia. I’m not looking forward to it. To be truthful, my dread of this surgery has tested my faith.  Yep, I’m a little bit scared.  

For many years I have enjoyed the writings of Scottish theologian Oswald Chambers. I first discovered him through his famous daily devotional, “My Utmost for His Highest.”  You might have noticed that I frequently quote Chambers in this blog. One of my favorite pieces of his wisdom is:   

The great word of Jesus to His disciples is Abandon. When God has brought us into the relationship of disciples, we have to venture on His word; trust entirely to Him and watch that when He brings us to the venture, we take it. 

The Apostle Paul is a great example of living a life abandoned to God. In Acts 20:22-24, Paul tells the elders of the Church at Ephesus, “And now, compelled by the Spirit, I am going to Jerusalem, not knowing what will happen to me there. I only know that in every city the Holy Spirit warns me that prison and hardships are facing me. However, I consider my life worth nothing to me; my only aim is to finish the race and complete the task the Lord Jesus has given me—the task of testifying to the good news of God’s grace.”

Throughout history, many people have chosen to abandon a sinking ship when the situation became so bad that an act of desperation appeared to be their only way out. Being abandoned to God is like jumping off a sinking ship and finding Jesus there, walking on the water and offering his hand to pull you above the dangerous waves as he whispers, “You of little faith, why did you doubt?”

A life of abandon is content with God, not with circumstances.  That’s how I want to live.  I close asking for your prayers as I undergo surgery on April 29. Until the next time!

Easter 2022: He is risen!

The risen Jesus approaching Mary Magdalene at his tomb

But on the first day of the week, at early dawn, they went to the tomb, taking the spices they had prepared. And they found the stone rolled away from the tomb, but when they went in they did not find the body of the Lord Jesus. While they were perplexed about this, behold, two men stood by them in dazzling apparel. … The men said to them, “Why do you seek the living among the dead? He is not here, but has risen. Remember how He told you, while He was still in Galilee, that the Son of Man must be delivered into the hands of sinful men and be crucified and on the third day rise.” And they remembered His words … (Luke 24:1-4, 5b-8)

Stay close to the word

“The Bible is not an option; it is a necessity. You cannot grow spiritually strong without it.” –Billy Graham

I’m shocked at how many professing Christians I’ve met know very little about the Bible. How can this be? The biblical Hebrew faith placed great emphasis on reading the Scriptures aloud and then interpreting the reading. Luke 4:14-20 tells us:

“Jesus returned to Galilee in the power of the Spirit, and news about him spread through the whole countryside. He was teaching in their synagogues, and everyone praised him. He went to Nazareth, where he had been brought up, and on the Sabbath day he went into the synagogue, as was his custom. He stood up to read, and the scroll of the prophet Isaiah was handed to him. Unrolling it, he found the place where it is written: ‘The Spirit of the Lord is on me, because he has anointed me to proclaim good news to the poor. He has sent me to proclaim freedom for the prisoners and recovery of sight for the blind, to set the oppressed free, to proclaim the year of the Lord’s favor.’ Then he rolled up the scroll, gave it back to the attendant and sat down. The eyes of everyone in the synagogue were fastened on him. He began by saying to them, ‘Today this scripture is fulfilled in your hearing.’”

When the people of Israel returned to Jerusalem after years of Babylonian captivity, the scribe Ezra brought the Book of the Law of Moses before them to read. Nehemiah 8:3 tells us, “He read it aloud from daybreak till noon as he faced the square before the Water Gate in the presence of the men, women and others who could understand. And all the people listened attentively to the Book of the Law.” Not only did the people listen to the reading of the Law from early morning until midday; they paid attention; they rose to their feet when Ezra opened the book (v.5); answered “Amen, Amen,” at the reading of the book (v.6); stood in their places (v.7); they all wept when they heard the words of the Law (v.9); and the people departed with great joy “because they now understood the words that had been made known to them” on that day (v.12).

The early Christians adopted a model of the public reading and interpretation of Scripture in worship; it has remained the practice in most Christian churches through the centuries. I was raised as a Southern Baptist, a denomination that emphasizes lifelong Bible study and exposes children to the Scripture from a very early age.  This occurs through the spoken word in sermons and Scripture readings during worship services; and by studying Scripture in Sunday school, Children’s Church, Bible studies, and other settings. The sermon is the centerpiece of the worship service. Immediately following the sermon there is a call by the preacher to respond to the sermon’s message by walking to the front of the sanctuary and professing one’s faith publicly or making a public rededication of one’s life to Christ.

Today I am an Anglican. Anglican worship services focus on “Word and Table,” the latter being the sacrament of Holy Communion. As for the word, Anglicans maintain a theological position that proclaiming the word is a means of grace; the word includes the sermon, but the emphasis is on proclaiming the witness to God in Jesus Christ and on God’s grace that flows through the proclamation. This proclamation is made both through Scripture reading and preaching a sermon. Sermons usually focus on one or more of the scripture selections in the appointed Lectionary readings of the day. The idea of the word places emphasis on the proclamation of Scripture as the spoken word of God that bears witness to the incarnate Word in Jesus Christ. However, it is not simply that it bears witness. The spoken word becomes the living and active word of God so that God speaks through the spoken word of Scripture. The spoken word becomes a means of grace.

Anglicans view the living word as a vehicle for performing God’s work in this world. As Hebrews 4:12 says, “For the word of God is alive and active. Sharper than any double-edged sword, it penetrates even to dividing soul and spirit, joints and marrow; it judges the thoughts and attitudes of the heart.’ Ephesians 8:17 calls the word “the Sword of the Spirit.”  The sword imagery is significant, as a sword is a weapon used both to deflect blows from an adversary and to strike back at one’s adversary.  When Jesus was tempted by Satan in the wilderness (Matthew 4:1-11), he refused Satan’s offers, citing Scripture as His defense and as a means of compelling Satan to depart from Him. Divine power flows from the words of Scripture.   

So, circling back to where I began, Christians need to study Scripture and theology! The late Rev. Dr. R. C.  Sproul explained it like this: “Many people believe that theological study holds little value. They say, ‘I don’t need theology; I just need to know Jesus.’ Yet theology is unavoidable for every Christian. It is our attempt to understand the truth that God has revealed to us—something every Christian does. So, it is not a question of whether we are going to engage in theology; it is a question of whether our theology is sound or unsound. It is important to study and learn because God has taken great pains to reveal Himself to His people. He gave us a book, one that is not meant to sit on a shelf pressing dried flowers, but to be read, searched, digested, studied, and chiefly to be understood.”

All Scripture is God-breathed and is useful for teaching, rebuking, correcting and training in righteousness, so that the servant of God may be thoroughly equipped for every good work.  –2 Timothy 3:16-17

Beware of bartering the Word of God for a more suitable conception of your own.  –Oswald Chambers, Disciples Indeed

Click the link below for ideas on how to start a daily devotional habit.

 https://www.woh.org/2022/01/24/how-to-start-a-devotional-habit/

Hitting the Jackpot*

* All Bible citations are NIV

What would you do if suddenly you became very wealthy?  What, you say you’re already very wealthy?  Then I urge you to read on anyway. Imagine hitting a big jackpot.  Maybe you pull the arm on a slot machine in Las Vegas and suddenly the grand prize lights start flashing and bells start ringing. Or could it be that the white Publishers Clearing House van turns into your driveway carrying a very large check with your name on it. Perhaps you hit all the numbers in the Powerball drawing.  Or maybe you won the multimillion dollar “Dream House” giveaway on the HGTV network.

I’ve tried to imagine what it would be like to hit it big.  With no more concerns for my personal financial needs, I’d share some of the winnings with family members to pay off mortgages, car loans, student debt and such.  Then I’d set up a nonprofit foundation to help the needy and give it all away.  What fun it would be to help change lives for the better. How easy it would be to give away money from an abundance of wealth.  Jesus commented on this to his disciples in the story of the Widow’s Mite.

Jesus sat down opposite the place where the offerings were put and watched the crowd putting their money into the temple treasury. Many rich people threw in large amounts. But a poor widow came and put in two very small copper coins, worth only a few cents. Calling his disciples to him, Jesus said, “Truly I tell you, this poor widow has put more into the treasury than all the others. They all gave out of their wealth; but she, out of her poverty, put in everything—all she had to live on.”  –Mark 12:41-44

I’ve wondered how being rich might change me.  Would I become more materialistic and spend on a massive house (or houses) and expensive cars?  Would I travel the world? Would I suddenly doubt the motives of people who tried to be friendly with me?  Would I change my phone number, delete this blog, delete my LinkedIn and Facebook accounts, and seek anonymity? Would I play the stock market and try to make even more money?  How much more would I need to satisfy me? Would I become miserly and try to hold on to all my wealth? Jesus cautioned about hoarding wealth in what is sometimes called as the parable of the Rich Fool.

And he (Jesus) told them this parable: “The ground of a certain rich man yielded an abundant harvest. He thought to himself, ‘What shall I do? I have no place to store my crops.’ “Then he said, ‘This is what I’ll do. I will tear down my barns and build bigger ones, and there I will store my surplus grain. And I’ll say to myself, “You have plenty of grain laid up for many years. Take life easy; eat, drink and be merry.”’ “But God said to him, ‘You fool! This very night your life will be demanded from you. Then who will get what you have prepared for yourself?’ “This is how it will be with whoever stores up things for themselves but is not rich toward God.”  –Luke 12:16-21

An abundance of wealth can make one feel very content, very secure, and very self-reliant. How easy would it be to lose touch with God in such circumstances—to forgo daily communion with God through prayer and the reading of the Word? If all my worldly needs were already provided for, would I still be inclined to pray to the Father, “Give us this day our daily bread.”  Perhaps that’s why Jesus taught his disciples:

“Again, I tell you, it is easier for a camel to go through the eye of a needle than for someone who is rich to enter the kingdom of God.” Matthew 19:24

It is a blessing to kneel and sincerely ask God to provide for one’s daily needs.  I am an Anglican. Anglicans follow a Christian tradition that evolved out of the practices, liturgy and identity of the Church of England following the Protestant Reformation. It should come as no surprise that the fastest growing group of Anglicans in the world are in the African churches—places like Rwanda, Uganda, Nigeria and South Africa. Many African Anglicans have suffered terribly from poverty, disease, famine, ethnic cleansing, and multiple forms of discrimination. Some were forced from their homes and lived for a time as displaced persons in their own countries or even spent long periods in refugee camps in a neighboring country.  

Many of these people became believers when they discovered hope in God when they had little else remaining. For many of them, losing everything led to a deep-rooted faith in God. How sweet it is to depend upon the Father for one’s daily needs.

“And why do you worry about clothes? See how the flowers of the field grow. They do not labor or spin. Yet I tell you that not even Solomon in all his splendor was dressed like one of these. If that is how God clothes the grass of the field, which is here today and tomorrow is thrown into the fire, will he not much more clothe you—you of little faith? So do not worry, saying, ‘What shall we eat?’ or ‘What shall we drink?’ or ‘What shall we wear?’ For the pagans run after all these things, and your heavenly Father knows that you need them. But seek first his kingdom and his righteousness, and all these things will be given to you as well. Therefore, do not worry about tomorrow, for tomorrow will worry about itself. Each day has enough trouble of its own.  Matthew 6:28-34

Do we expect God to come to us with His blessings and save us? He says, “Look to Me, and be saved….” The greatest difficulty spiritually is to concentrate on God, and His blessings are what make it so difficult. Troubles almost always make us look to God, but His blessings tend to divert our attention elsewhere. The basic lesson of the Sermon on the Mount is to narrow all your interests until your mind, heart, and body are focused on Jesus Christ. –Oswald Chambers in My Utmost for His Highest

The Christmas Crazies

The secret of Christmas is that in our search for the great and the extraordinary, we are drown to the inconspicuous and the small.  –Unknown

Chevy Chase’s iconic movie Christmas Vacation is a caricature of the so-called “perfect Christmas” many people dream of.  The problem is, his image of the perfect Christmas is a myth. Chase portrays the main character Clark Griswold, a mid-level employee in a large food manufacturing corporation.  Clark dreams of having the perfect Christmas with his wife Ellen (played by Beverly D’Angelo), their children, and their extended family.  The Griswold’s house guests include Clark’s and Ellen’s aging parents, a senile stogie-smoking uncle, a dizzy aunt, and an uninvited lovable dimwit cousin named Eddie along with his wife and children.

The Griswold family Christmas becomes a long chain of catastrophes including a nearly fatal traffic encounter with two hicks in a pickup truck, a way too big Christmas tree, an elaborate Christmas light display on their house that won’t light, a destructive dog appropriately named Snots, Ellen’s irritating parents (a lush and a curmudgeon), a dead cat in the living room, a crazed squirrel in the house, an obnoxious couple of yuppie neighbors, and a botched Christmas dinner.  The pièce de résistance occurs when Clark receives notice that his annual pay bonus has been canceled by the CEO of his company. The news drives poor Clark to deliver one of the most memorable, obscenity laden rants in Hollywood movie history.

Clark Griswold is a caricature of the stress, frustration and depression that sadly affects many during the Christmas season. Lots of people overload their lives during the this season—on top of their normal jobs and family/home responsibilities they add Christmas concerts, Hallmark Christmas movies, cookie baking, party going and hosting, gift shopping, gift wrapping, Christmas cards and letters, binge eating and drinking, and social media posts with staged photos depicting how much fun they’re having—not! Did you experience stress, frustration, depression—or a combination of all three—during the Christmas season this year? If so, maybe it’s time to consider how you might observe Christmas differently next year.

The holiday season is a perfect time to reflect on our blessings and seek ways to make life better for those around us. –Terry Mitchell

Maybe next Christmas can be a festival of slowing down, regrouping and recognizing what is really important in your life; a chance to experience peace, gratitude, and closeness with those you love, both friends and family. Christmas is a wonderful occasion for charity, contemplation, mindfulness and joy. It’s a time to look back on what was, appreciate what is, and look confidently towards the future.  Next year give yourself the gift of peace for Christmas! Jesus, the only begotten Son of God, the light of the world, Jesus the Prince of Peace, was born of the Virgin Mary to restore mankind’s relationship with the Creator. I hope you will make him the Center of your Christmas season next year.

And there were in the same country shepherds abiding in the field, keeping watch over their flock by night. And, lo, the angel of the Lord came upon them, and the glory of the Lord shone round about them: and they were sore afraid. And the angel said unto them, Fear not: for, behold, I bring you good tidings of great joy, which shall be to all people. For unto you is born this day in the city of David a Saviour, which is Christ the Lord. –Luke 2:8-11

Check back next year for my next post. Have a blessed and prosperous New Year!

Peace on earth will come to stay, when we live Christmas every day. –Helen Steiner Rice

“Spirit of Christmas” performed by Ray Charles https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EaAdg_l38Cc

For unto you…

“Behold, the virgin shall be with child, and bear a Son, and they shall call His name Immanuel,” which is translated, “God with us.”

Matthew 1:23

I promise

The Miriam Webster Dictionary defines the word promise as “a statement telling someone that you will definitely do something or that something will definitely happen in the future.”  In Western culture, a promise is not something to be taken lightly (unless perhaps you’re a politician).  Anyone who has raised a child knows that a promise carries weight.

If you’ve ever planned to do something with a child—say a Saturday afternoon trip to the zoo—and subsequently had to cancel, then you have probably had a conversation like this:

Dad: “Sweetie I’m sorry, but we won’t be able to go to the zoo tomorrow.  Something came up at work.”

Child: “When are you going to take me?”

Dad: “How about next Saturday?”

Child: “Do you promise?”

Dad: “We’ll see.”

The “We’ll see” response is a rather hollow attempt at not having to break a promise the dad made to the child. No parent wants to break a promise made to their child.

There is a special kind of promise called a covenant.  Covenants typically entail a personal relationship between the various parties to the promises made.  If you’ve ever been a member of a home owners association (HOA), you’ve probably read, or at least heard of, the HOA covenants.  These are the rules and regulations that all home owners belonging to the association agree to follow.  Human covenants typically contain stipulations, a condition or requirement that is specified or demanded as part of an agreement.  For example, your mailbox must match the color of your house, or boats are not to be parked in driveways for more than 24 hours. For breaking or violating these covenants, there is usually some sort of penalty that must be paid.  In the case of a HOA, this is often a monetary fine.

For Christ followers, marriage vows are a form of covenant and a pretty demanding, “for better or for worse…in sickness and in health…until death do us part.”

The Bible contains many covenants.  While the exact number is a point of debate, there are five core covenants forming the foundation of God’s plan for the redemption of mankind through faith in Jesus Christ. These covenants were made with Noah, Abraham, Moses/Israel, David and finally the New Covenant of salvation through Jesus Christ.

Noahic Covenant God promises to never again destroy mankind or other living creatures. This covenant was without stipulations. Instead, God will fulfill the redemptive promise of Genesis 3:15.

 Abrahamic Covenant – God promises to make a great nation out of childless Abraham, assuring him that his descendants will outnumber the stars. Abraham is to forsake his land and follow God wherever he leads.  All the while, Abraham and his family are to walk blamelessly before God and to follow the practice of circumcision in every Generation.

Mosaic Covenant (with Israel) – God rescues the Hebrew people from the bondage of slavery in Egypt and promises to make them his own people and a nation of priests.  In turn, the people must abide by the laws given to Moses by God on Mount Sinai.

Davidic Covenant – God establishes David as Israel’s king. Through David’s royal lineage he will fulfill the promises He made to Abraham and Israel. In return, David and his lineage must remain faithful to God and obey God’s covenantal laws.

The New Covenant of Jesus Christ –   Jesus is the culmination of God’s saving grace for his people. Christ is, as John the Baptist called him, “the Lamb of God who takes away the sins of the world.” This is a covenant of Grace without stipulations.

There is a major difference between the covenants of man and the covenants of God. People routinely violate the covenants, while God never breaks a promise.  The covenants of God do not replace the ones that came before—they build upon them, because it is impossible for God to lie or break a promise. Before the foundation of the world, our omniscient God made a plan for the redemption of sinful mankind.  Jesus is the fulfillment of God’s promise of man’s redemption, which was planned out through the five covenants discussed herein.  Thanks be to God that his promises are faithful and true!

 But when the set time had fully come, God sent his Son, born of a woman, born under the law, to redeem those under the law, that we might receive adoption to sonship. Because you are his sons, God sent the Spirit of his Son into our hearts, the Spirit who calls out, “Abba, Father.”  So, you are no longer a slave, but God’s child; and since you are his child, God has made you also an heir. –Galatians 4:4-7